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Nikola Tesla once “shook the poop out” of a constipated Mark Twain with an experiment.

05/07/2016

Nikola Tesla was a Serbian-American discoverer, electrical engineer, mechanical engineer, physicist, and a thinker best recognized for his assistances to the plan of the modern alternating current (AC) power source system. Nikola Tesla was well-known for his attainments and showmanship, ultimately receiving him a status in prevalent society as an exemplary “mad scientist”. Tesla acquired about 300 copyrights universally for his creations.

He had a great sense of humour and use to try his experiments by inviting his friends to his laboratory. Telsa met Mark Twain (American author and humorist) via New York City social club. Their friendship reached far more than just an acquaintance. Telsa knew that Mark had a constipation problem, and so he invited him to his laboratory to witness his marvellous electric experiment.

The experiment went like this- he had created a high-pitched frequency oscillator device in his Manhattan laboratory that was called earthquake machine. A piston set beneath a stand in the research laboratory trembled wildly as it moved. He commanded Mark to stand on the platform of the device, while he spun the oscillator. The vibrations were so high that Twain hopped off the platform and ran to the lavatories.

The experiment didn’t bring any harm to the block but “shook the poop out” of a constipated Mark Twain. There is also a photograph picturing Mark and Telsa during the experiment. The experiment was done just for fun, but the vibrations of the machine shivered Mark Twain completely.

Tesla’s inheritance has persisted in books, films, radio, TV, music, live theatre, comics and video games. The influence of the types of machinery invented or anticipated by Tesla is a frequent subject in numerous types of science fantasy. Telsa had a brilliant mind and first one to think about information transformation in the sense of communication.

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